Compelling evidence shows a low-carb diet can work as a preventative for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s as well as many other chronic conditions2019-02-26T15:19:50+00:00

Compelling evidence shows a low-carb diet can work as a preventative for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s as well as many other chronic conditions

When we talked with Cliff Harvey, clinical nutritionist and researcher, he told us his research has shown there’s so much which can be done for a whole range of conditions using a low-carb diet: “We’re only just scratching the surface of what can be done for a whole range of conditions. There’s emerging evidence a low-carb diet will help with cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. There’s a high connection between a high-carb and low fat diet – and these conditions. There’s also a massive link between diet and autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.”

Harvey’s been conducting research in this area for many years. His latest research has been conducted with his doctoral supervisor, Professor Grant Schofield, and it’s this research which is showing compelling evidence for the use of a low-carb diet for many conditions: “We see a lot of evidence to support a low-carb diet helps with a whole range of mental health conditions including depression and bipolar. I certainly think there’s a lot of promise for many chronic conditions when using the low-carb diet.”

Survival times for these diseases is so poor

Harvey added: “The evidence to support this is so compelling and the survival times for these diseases is so poor. When we poll people, it’s often found that, as they age, they’re more concerned about brain health. But the average person doesn’t seem to know that the average life span after diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is 3 to 9 years. The decline is pretty rapid. So when people are starting to decline then that’s when we should be applying all of this new research to try and work on these conditions.”

Harvey will be giving two presentations around this topic at the ACNEM Conference in May titled: Determining ‘Carbohydrate Appropriate’ – Individualising Nutrition Prescription to the Patient and

Discovering variation in responses to differing diets. Evaluating key cases.

In the second presentation when he evaluates key cases, he’ll be showing results for two patients with advanced Hyperlipidaemia – distorted blood levels profile with 10 times the normal triglyceride levels – and how they responded to a very low-carb diet.

Advanced Hyperlipidaemia reversed within a year

“Their condition was reversed within a year and for a very high level of Hyperlipidaemia, that’s very good,” said Harvey.

“We know there’s a heavy genetic component with Hyperlipidaemia and also being sedentary, high stress and a poor modern-style diet overall can affect this disease a great deal,” he added. “But when I show the two examples of these two athletes with Hyperlipidaemia, one does very well on a high-carb diet and one does well on a low-carb diet. They both end up thriving and are metabolically efficient. The reason athletes can have a slightly higher carb content is the fact they train with a very high intensity.”

Harvey went on to say one of the key findings is the fact there is now a way to ‘determine’ the ‘carb appropriate’ diet for the individual. His second presentation at the conference will examine this, titled: Determining ‘Carbohydrate Appropriate’ – Individualising Nutrition Prescription to the Patient.

“We’ve found a person’s blood panel is the best predictor and this is an area no-one’s really researched before. There’s not been much discussion about how we can determine exactly what level of carb is the best for some people,” he added.

“We’ve seen certain things in a blood panel which we’ve found can predict the correct level of carbohydrate for each individual. We’re going to be publishing this in all the correct avenues. Our articles on this are already getting an amazing response. I’ll be writing it up in stories and a book which will make it easier to understand in the context. At this stage it’s early research, but we know it will have a large impact,” he added.

Here are some links to Harvey’s recent research:

https://peerj.com/articles/4488/?utm_source=TrendMD&utm_campaign=PeerJ_TrendMD_1&utm_medium=TrendMD

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnme/2018/2630565/abs/

https://peerj.com/articles/6273/

Cliff Harvey is a registered clinical nutritionist and researcher. He’s been coaching people ranging from world champion athletes through to the chronically and acutely unwell to perform at their best, since the 1990s. Harvey was one of the first practitioners in Australasia to start working with low-carb and ketogenic diets in the late 1990s and has pioneered their use in this part of the word.

Harvey now focusses mostly on teaching and research, especially in helping people determine the correct diet for their body and lifestyle. Cliff’s masters research focused on the use of medium chain triglycerides to mitigate keto-flu and encourage faster induction of ketosis, and his PhD research is focused on identifying markers of carbohydrate tolerance.

He is the founder of the Holistic Performance Institute, a private post-tertiary college, Nutrition Store Online, a distributor of quality health and performance supplements, and a co-founder of Nuzest, a global supplement company.

Harvey is the author of seven books including the The Carbohydrate Appropriate Diet, 99 Things You Need to Know to Lose Fat! and The Keto-Appropriate Diet. For more information visit:

www.cliffharvey.com

twitter.com/carbappropriate

facebook.com/cliffharveyauthor

You can see Cliff Harvey giving two presentations titled: Discovering variation in responses to differing diets. Evaluating key cases and Determining ‘Carbohydrate Appropriate’ – Individualising Nutrition Prescription to the Patient at the ACNEM Conference called Evolving Landscapes of Nutrition in Medicine, held in Melbourne from 24-26th May this year.