Protect your prostate2019-05-09T09:11:34+00:00

Protect your prostate

Urology is a surgical speciality with a cut to cure ethos. But world leading Urologist Dr Noor Buchholz knows the right nutrition and lifestyle are essential to protecting the prostate.

Dr Buchholz will present Metabolism and Common Urological Diseases – Prostate and Stones at the 9th Annual ACNEM Conference: Evolving Landscapes of Nutrition in Medicine.

Dr Buchholz is a world leader in urology. Trained in Germany, Switzerland and Australia he was the Director of Stone Services & Endourology at The Royal London Hospital and board member of the Stone Section of the European Association of Urology.

The top urological diseases are prostate conditions and urinary stones and Dr Buchholz is calling surgeons to rethink the ‘cutting to cure’ treatment.

“A more holistic approach is warranted and recognising the role of nutrition may be a first step,” he said.

Dr Buchholz said if a patient has prostate cancer it will be treated surgically or with radiotherapy/hormone therapy but the next stage of treatment should be holistic.

“If someone has survived this cancer they can boost their immune system in a more general way with healthy nutrition, keeping fit and a good lifestyle. All of these things will help,” he said.

Three basic ground rules to avoid urinary stones 

  1. Drink more than 2.5 litres of water per day
  2. Avoid salt
  3. Cut down on meat

Prostate cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world

Dr Buchholz said prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and benign prostate hyperplasia or BPH affects 50% of men aged over 50.

He warns we can’t treat prostate cancer (PCa) with nutrition alone but his research proves good eating will help decrease the risk of developing a more aggressive form of PCa and slow its progression.

“In particular green tea, lycopene’s and pomegranate have been found effective. They work for different pathways and stop inflammatory reactions of cells,” Dr Buchholz said.

“To the contrary, a high intake of calcium, selenium and vitamin E have been found to be counterproductive.”

Dr Buchholz said natural nutrients in the form of phytotherapies have been used for centuries to combat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH).

“Today there is still a huge market for these supplements,” he said.

“A diet rich in vegetables and low in animal protein together with supplementation of zinc and vitamin D seems to have a beneficial effect on BPH.”

A link between stones and metabolic syndrome

Dr Buchholz said new research indicates supplements can also reduce the incidence of stones forming.

“Recently, a link has been postulated between stones and metabolic syndrome. Treat MetS and you treat the stones,” he said.

“Antioxidants can protect the kidney and Vitamin B6 and Oxalobacter formigenes can reduce urinary oxalate, a main component of stones,” he said.

“Citrate and magnesium are known stone inhibitors too.”

pH and stone formation

Dr Buchholz said stone formation is a process involving supersaturation of salts, crystal formation and adhesion as well as tubular cell injuries and disbalances.

He said any ingestion of substances which either change our acid base balance or are directly excreted in the kidney may have the potential to affect stone formation.

“Metabolic syndrome changes the pH of the body and depending on the acidity, the higher it is the easier it is for crystals to precipitate. The more acidic, the higher the chance calcium oxalate crystals can form and calcium oxalate makes up 80% of stones,” he said.

Dr Buchholz said he tells his patients to eat less salt and animal protein and drink more than 2.5 litres of water per day.

“It makes sense that you have to dilute the urine to bring these salts back into solution,” he said.

Men aged over 50 be screened for prostate cancer and enlargement once a year. If they have a family history of prostate cancer they should start this screening at the age of 45.

Three basic ground rules to avoid urinary stones 

  1.  Drink more than 2.5 litres of water per day.
  2.  Avoid salt
  3. Cut down on meat

Dr Buchholz will present Metabolism and Common Urological Diseases at the 9th Annual ACNEM Conference: Sunday May 26th at 11.30am.

Dr Noor Buchholz was trained in Germany, Switzerland and Australia. He was the Director of Stone Services & Endourology at The Royal London Hospital and sat on the board of the Stone Section of the European Association of Urology (eULIS-EAU).

Dr Buchholz is an accomplished, world-renowned, experienced urologist who deals with all diseases of the urinary system. He was one of only 50 trainers worldwide recognised by the International Endourology Society (IES). He has authored more than 300 articles and book chapters in world-class scientific publications.